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3/25/2016 9:00:25 AM Easter Pagan origins  

asanb
Over 4,000 Posts! (4,645)
Sanbornton, NH
60, joined Jul. 2012


"according to Jacob Grimm’s Deutsche Mythologie, which he wrote after journeying across Germany and recording its oral mythological traditions, the idea of resurrection was part and parcel of celebrating the goddess Ostara:

“Ostara, Eástre seems therefore to have been the divinity of the radiant dawn, of upspringing light, a spectacle that brings joy and blessing, whose meaning could be easily adapted by the resurrection-day of the christian’s God. Bonfires were lighted at Easter and according to popular belief of long standing, the moment the sun rises on Easter Sunday morning, he gives three joyful leaps, he dances for joy … Water drawn on the Easter morning is, like that at Christmas, holy and healing … here also heathen notions seems to have grafted themselves on great christian festivals. Maidens clothed in white, who at Easter, at the season of returning spring, show themselves in clefts of the rock and on mountains, are suggestive of the ancient goddess.”

Spring is a sort of resurrection after all, with the land coming back to life after lying dead and bare during the winter months. To say that ancient peoples thought otherwise is foolish, naïve and downright uninformed. Many, many pagan celebrations centre around the return of light and the rebirth of the land; these ideas are not new themes in the slightest.

And yes, rabbits and eggs are fertility symbols, and they are, in fact, associated with Eostre."

http://bellejar.ca/2013/03/28/easter-is-not-named-after-ishtar-and-other-truths-i-have-to-tell-you/

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3/25/2016 9:22:21 AM Easter Pagan origins  
Yasureoktoo
Over 10,000 Posts!!! (21,994)
Seattle, WA
61, joined Dec. 2014


The problem we have in this day and age is that we could, right now, invent a deity, and give it certain characteristics straight from our imagination, and it would turn out someone had that one before.

3/25/2016 9:29:44 AM Easter Pagan origins  

rufftreasure
Over 10,000 Posts!!! (15,483)
Fairmont, MN
60, joined Jun. 2014


Quote from asanb:
"according to Jacob Grimm’s Deutsche Mythologie, which he wrote after journeying across Germany and recording its oral mythological traditions, the idea of resurrection was part and parcel of celebrating the goddess Ostara:

“Ostara, Eástre seems therefore to have been the divinity of the radiant dawn, of upspringing light, a spectacle that brings joy and blessing, whose meaning could be easily adapted by the resurrection-day of the christian’s God. Bonfires were lighted at Easter and according to popular belief of long standing, the moment the sun rises on Easter Sunday morning, he gives three joyful leaps, he dances for joy … Water drawn on the Easter morning is, like that at Christmas, holy and healing … here also heathen notions seems to have grafted themselves on great christian festivals. Maidens clothed in white, who at Easter, at the season of returning spring, show themselves in clefts of the rock and on mountains, are suggestive of the ancient goddess.”

Spring is a sort of resurrection after all, with the land coming back to life after lying dead and bare during the winter months. To say that ancient peoples thought otherwise is foolish, naïve and downright uninformed. Many, many pagan celebrations centre around the return of light and the rebirth of the land; these ideas are not new themes in the slightest.

And yes, rabbits and eggs are fertility symbols, and they are, in fact, associated with Eostre."

http://bellejar.ca/2013/03/28/easter-is-not-named-after-ishtar-and-other-truths-i-have-to-tell-you/


Yes, this is how I celebrate resurrection, during the spring equinox.


Resurrection in the sense of the procession of the seasons.



[Edited 3/25/2016 9:30:46 AM ]

3/25/2016 10:15:22 AM Easter Pagan origins  

wayn49
Over 2,000 Posts (3,851)
Birmingham, AL
54, joined Feb. 2011


yes there are pagan traditions in Easter and it was substituted and replaced with the suffering and death and resurrection of Jesus

we use to as kids color eggs and find them and candy etc

i see nothing wrong in celebrating our Lord Jesus for what he has done

3/25/2016 10:20:31 AM Easter Pagan origins  

ludlowlowell
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It doesn't bother me one bit that Easter has pagan origins. It doesn't bother me one bit that the early Christians took a pagan holiday and Christianized it. Easter celebrates the Resurrection of Jesus. How could we NOT celebrate such a happy day?

3/25/2016 10:48:06 AM Easter Pagan origins  

isna_la_wica
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There are Pagan origins in every thing.

Before Christianity came about, well, our ancestors were Pagan in one way or another.So, what?

It bothers me not in the slightest.

I celebrate this day for what I believe, and it does not bother me at all what my ancestors celebrated or others today do.

Pretty sure we are not breaking any patent, copy write laws or stealing intellectual property.

3/25/2016 11:02:10 AM Easter Pagan origins  

rufftreasure
Over 10,000 Posts!!! (15,483)
Fairmont, MN
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No isna, but some who are not pagan, actually deny the pagan origins

3/25/2016 11:27:32 AM Easter Pagan origins  

olderthandirt20
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Religions often steal/appropriate/borrow from earlier religions, it's the way they evolve.
The ideals of godship are limited afterall .

3/25/2016 11:50:18 AM Easter Pagan origins  

rufftreasure
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Yes, and note how they evolve, it's really regression ,in my opinion.

3/25/2016 2:46:35 PM Easter Pagan origins  

ludlowlowell
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Rufftreasure, what part of Christianity do you find regressive? The part that calls for repentance?

3/25/2016 5:03:40 PM Easter Pagan origins  

isna_la_wica
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In every religion, there are those that are regressive and some who are more 'progressive'.

Its the same in every human endeavor of any sort. From politics, to choosing what we eat.

Its part of a personality trait I believe. Some see only black and white while others can paint a master piece with a hundred colours.

3/25/2016 8:05:36 PM Easter Pagan origins  

rufftreasure
Over 10,000 Posts!!! (15,483)
Fairmont, MN
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Quote from ludlowlowell:
Rufftreasure, what part of Christianity do you find regressive? The part that calls for repentance?


No ,the part about how Jesus began a movement based on loving the poor, the sick, the widowed the orphans, loving you neighbors as yourself. How this regressed into the institution it's become. Repentance you ask? If I see that I have harmed someone, I make direct amends, and ask forgiveness, or they ask forgiveness, and I forgive. This is the way you see repentance, practically applied. What good is it to ask forgiveness, from a God if you don't treat your brothers and sisters well? I have changed many things in my life, repented from harmful behaviors, and it wasn't because I was afraid of hell, it was because it's the right thing to do This is called taking personal responsibility for your own actions. None of it has anything to do with an action or inaction of any God. Everything we do comes from our own personal choices. We punish or reward ourselves with what ever repercussions come from that choice, whether good choices or bad.

3/25/2016 8:06:45 PM Easter Pagan origins  

rufftreasure
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Fairmont, MN
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Quote from isna_la_wica:
In every religion, there are those that are regressive and some who are more 'progressive'.

Its the same in every human endeavor of any sort. From politics, to choosing what we eat.

Its part of a personality trait I believe. Some see only black and white while others can paint a master piece with a hundred colours.



Yes

3/25/2016 10:12:02 PM Easter Pagan origins  

w6o6l6f_1
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Richmond, VA
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Happy (spring) vernal equinox.

The egg is a symbol of the Moon.
The rabbit is a symbol of fertility.

3/25/2016 10:15:36 PM Easter Pagan origins  

rufftreasure
Over 10,000 Posts!!! (15,483)
Fairmont, MN
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Quote from w6o6l6f_1:
Happy (spring) vernal equinox.

The egg is a symbol of the Moon.
The rabbit is a symbol of fertility.


Oestra, for estrogen, Ostara the Goddess, and resurrection of the earth.

3/26/2016 10:47:51 AM Easter Pagan origins  

iyamwutiyam
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Middelfart
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Quote from wayn49:
yes there are pagan traditions in Easter and it was substituted and replaced with the suffering and death and resurrection of Jesus
Utter ignorance of history. Lots of man-god deaths were about resurrection. Jesus is a copied myth.


i see nothing wrong in celebrating our Lord Jesus for what he has done
That's because you're ignorant. Jesus implored self-hatred, no attraction towards woman, putting your family and friends last to serve him. He committed cruelty to animals, prone to irrational outbursts, megalomania, insulting bigotry, and insanity by cursing a tree.



[Edited 3/26/2016 10:48:05 AM ]

3/26/2016 11:40:18 AM Easter Pagan origins  

wayn49
Over 2,000 Posts (3,851)
Birmingham, AL
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Quote from iyamwutiyam:
That's because you're ignorant. Jesus implored self-hatred, no attraction towards woman, putting your family and friends last to serve him. He committed cruelty to animals, prone to irrational outbursts, megalomania, insulting bigotry, and insanity by cursing a tree.



sorry you feel that way but you got it all wrong

3/26/2016 8:59:30 PM Easter Pagan origins  

iyamwutiyam
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Middelfart
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Quote from wayn49:
sorry you feel that way but you got it all wrong


You're incapable of refuting the myth. The myth writers wrote the scriptures in Greek. Greeks were excellent story tellers. The figure Jesus displayed all the qualities I wrote above.

3/26/2016 9:53:03 PM Easter Pagan origins  

ludlowlowell
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But you are incapable of proving that it is a myth. For all you know, God might exist, and the Jesus story might be true in its entirety.

3/26/2016 10:07:19 PM Easter Pagan origins  

rufftreasure
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Wishful thinking .

3/26/2016 11:34:06 PM Easter Pagan origins  

iyamwutiyam
Over 7,500 Posts!! (9,286)
Middelfart
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Quote from ludlowlowell:
But you are incapable of proving that it is a myth. For all you know, God might exist, and the Jesus story might be true in its entirety.


Lud, everywhere you go you expose your lack of education and intelligence.

3/27/2016 10:51:51 PM Easter Pagan origins  

w6o6l6f_1
Over 10,000 Posts!!! (10,005)
Richmond, VA
38, joined May. 2014


This is the time of year to start planting.
The Equinox was on the celestial 20th.
Easter is always on a Sunday.

3/30/2016 9:58:33 PM Easter Pagan origins  

asanb
Over 4,000 Posts! (4,645)
Sanbornton, NH
60, joined Jul. 2012


When Osiris is said to bring his believers eternal life in Egyptian Heaven, contemplating the unutterable, indescribable glory of God, we understand that as a myth.


When the sacred rites of Demeter at Eleusis are described as bringing believers happiness in their eternal life, we understand that as a myth.

In fact, when ancient writers tell us that in general ancient people believed in eternal life, with the good going to the Elysian Fields and the not so good going to Hades, we understand that as a myth.

When Vespatian's spittle healed a blind man, we understand that as a myth.

When Apollonius of Tyana raised a girl from death, we understand that as a myth.

When the Pythia , the priestess at the Oracle at Delphi, in Greece, prophesied, and over and over again for a thousand years, the prophecies came true, we understand that as a myth.


When Dionysus turned water into wine, we understand that as a myth. When Dionysus believers are filled with atay, the Spirit of God, we understand that as a myth.

When Romulus is described as the Son of God, born of a virgin, we understand that as a myth.


When Alexander the Great is described as the Son of God, born of a mortal woman, we understand that as a myth.


When Augustus is described as the Son of God, born of a mortal , we understand that as a myth.


When Dionysus is described as the Son of God, born of a mortal woman, we understand that as a myth.

When Scipio Africanus (Scipio Africanus, for Christ's sake) is described as the Son of God, born of a mortal woman, we understand that as a myth.


So how come when Jesus is described as
the Son of God,
born of a mortal woman,
according to prophecy,
turning water into wine,
raising girls from the dead, and
healing blind men with his spittle,
and setting it up so His believers got eternal life in Heaven contemplating the unutterable, indescribable glory of God, and off to Hades—er, I mean Hell—for the bad folks...
how come that's not a myth?

http://pocm.info/

3/31/2016 9:05:21 AM Easter Pagan origins  

kb2222
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Jacksonville, FL
75, joined Apr. 2011


The Urantia Book
Paper 1
The Universal Father *


1:0.1 (21.1) THE Universal Father is the God of all creation, the First Source and Center of all things and beings. First think of God as a creator, then as a controller, and lastly as an infinite upholder. The truth about the Universal Father had begun to dawn upon mankind when the prophet said: “You, God, are alone; there is none beside you. You have created the heaven and the heaven of heavens, with all their hosts; you preserve and control them. By the Sons of God were the universes made. The Creator covers himself with light as with a garment and stretches out the heavens as a curtain.” Only the concept of the Universal Father — one God in the place of many gods — enabled mortal man to comprehend the Father as divine creator and infinite controller.

1:0.2 (21.2) The myriads of planetary systems were all made to be eventually inhabited by many different types of intelligent creatures, beings who could know God, receive the divine affection, and love him in return. The universe of universes is the work of God and the dwelling place of his diverse creatures. “God created the heavens and formed the earth; he established the universe and created this world not in vain; he formed it to be inhabited.”

1:0.3 (21.3) The enlightened worlds all recognize and worship the Universal Father, the eternal maker and infinite upholder of all creation. The will creatures of universe upon universe have embarked upon the long, long Paradise journey, the fascinating struggle of the eternal adventure of attaining God the Father. The transcendent goal of the children of time is to find the eternal God, to comprehend the divine nature, to recognize the Universal Father. God-knowing creatures have only one supreme ambition, just one consuming desire, and that is to become, as they are in their spheres, like him as he is in his Paradise perfection of personality and in his universal sphere of righteous supremacy. From the Universal Father who inhabits eternity there has gone forth the supreme mandate, “Be you perfect, even as I am perfect.” In love and mercy the messengers of Paradise have carried this divine exhortation down through the ages and out through the universes, even to such lowly animal-origin creatures as the human races of Urantia.

1:0.4 (22.1) This magnificent and universal injunction to strive for the attainment of the perfection of divinity is the first duty, and should be the highest ambition, of all the struggling creature creation of the God of perfection. This possibility of the attainment of divine perfection is the final and certain destiny of all man’s eternal spiritual progress.

1:0.5 (22.2) Urantia mortals can hardly hope to be perfect in the infinite sense, but it is entirely possible for human beings, starting out as they do on this planet, to attain the supernal and divine goal which the infinite God has set for mortal man; and when they do achieve this destiny, they will, in all that pertains to self-realization and mind attainment, be just as replete in their sphere of divine perfection as God himself is in his sphere of infinity and eternity. Such perfection may not be universal in the material sense, unlimited in intellectual grasp, or final in spiritual experience, but it is final and complete in all finite aspects of divinity of will, perfection of personality motivation, and God-consciousness.

1:0.6 (22.3) This is the true meaning of that divine command, “Be you perfect, even as I am perfect,” which ever urges mortal man onward and beckons him inward in that long and fascinating struggle for the attainment of higher and higher levels of spiritual values and true universe meanings. This sublime search for the God of universes is the supreme adventure of the inhabitants of all the worlds of time and space.

http://www.urantia.org/urantia-book-standardized/paper-1-universal-father

3/31/2016 5:52:45 PM Easter Pagan origins  

asanb
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Sanbornton, NH
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Um, KB, What does that have to do with the topic? No mention of pagan thought....Just another excuse to post an excerpt from your holy book? Get with the discussion or don't post.

3/31/2016 8:35:12 PM Easter Pagan origins  

kb2222
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I thought it an appropriate response to you positing the question how come Jesus is not a myth but if it bothers you I want post on this thread anymore. That's fine with me. Stay spiritually lost.

3/31/2016 8:53:41 PM Easter Pagan origins  

rufftreasure
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Fairmont, MN
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4/1/2016 9:51:30 AM Easter Pagan origins  

nonstandard
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York, PA
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Being something , will never make you better than everything . One is one , there is no escape , there is only compliance .

4/1/2016 9:58:42 AM Easter Pagan origins  

rufftreasure
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In order for a person to comply ,you must understand just what you are complying with.

Now it's a wise decision to to comply with the universal laws of nature, that to me is a given, else you may finding yourself feeling like the universe is against you, and if you fight going with that flow, you are just fighting against the universe and ultimately , yourself.

4/1/2016 10:08:32 AM Easter Pagan origins  

nonstandard
Over 2,000 Posts (3,641)
York, PA
53, joined Jun. 2009


Quote from rufftreasure:
In order for a person to comply ,you must understand just what you are complying with.

Now it's a wise decision to to comply with the universal laws of nature, that to me is a given, else you may finding yourself feeling like the universe is against you, and if you fight going with that flow, you are just fighting against the universe and ultimately , yourself.


Exactly

4/1/2016 10:43:01 AM Easter Pagan origins  

rufftreasure
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4/3/2016 3:33:04 PM Easter Pagan origins  

asanb
Over 4,000 Posts! (4,645)
Sanbornton, NH
60, joined Jul. 2012


Pagan roots of Easter lie in celebrating the spring equinox, for millennia an important holiday in many religions. Celebrating the beginning of spring may be among the oldest holidays in human culture. Occurring every year on March 20, 21, or 22, the spring equinox is the end of winter and beginning of spring. Biologically and culturally, it represents for northern climates the end of a ?dead? season and the rebirth of life, as well as the importance of fertility and reproduction.

Easter & Zoroastrianism:


The earliest reference we have to a similar holiday comes to us from Babylon, 2400 BCE. The city of Ur apparently had a celebration dedicated to the moon and the spring equinox which was held some time during our months of March or April. On the spring equinox Zoroastrians continue to celebrate ?No Ruz,? the new day or New Year. This date is commemorated by the last remaining Zoroastrians and probably constitutes the oldest celebration in the history of the world.

Easter & Judaism:


It is believed that the Jews derived their spring equinox celebrations, the Feast of Weeks and Passover, in part from this Babylonian holiday during the period when so many Jews were held captive by the Babylonian empire. It is likely that the Babylonians were the first, or at least among the first, civilizations to use the equinoxes as important turning points in the year. Today Passover is a central feature of Judaism and Jewish faith in God.

Fertility and Rebirth in the Spring:


Most cultures around the Mediterranean are believed to have had their own spring festivals: whereas in the north the vernal equinox is a time for planting, around the Mediterranean the vernal equinox is a time when the summer crops begin to sprout. This is an important sign of why it has always been a celebration of new life and a triumph of life over death.

Gods Dying and Being Reborn:


A focus of spring religious festivals was a god whose own death and rebirth symbolized the death and rebirth of life during this time of the year. Many pagan religions had gods who were depicted as dying and being reborn. In some legends this god even descends into the underworld to challenge the forces there. Attis, consort of the Phrygian fertility goddess Cybele, was more popular than most. In other cultures he acquired different names, including Osiris, Orpheus, Dionysus, and Tammuz.

Cybele in Ancient Rome:


Worship of Cybele started in Rome around 200 BCE, and a cult dedicated to her was even located in Rome on what is today Vatican Hill. It appears that when such pagans and early Christians lived in close proximity, they usually celebrated their spring festivals at the same time ? pagans honoring Attis and Christians honoring Jesus. Of course, both were inclined to argue that only theirs was the true God, a debate which hasn?t even been settled to this day.

Ostara, Eostre, and Easter:


Currently, modern Wiccans and neo-pagans celebrate ?Ostara,? a lesser Saabbat on the vernal equinox. Other names for this celebration include Eostre and Oestara and they are derived from the Anglo-Saxon lunar Goddess, Eostre. Some believe that this name is ultimately a variation on the names of other prominent goddesses, like Ishtar, Astarte, and Isis, usually a consort of the gods Osiris or Dionysus, who are depicted as dying and being reborn.

Pagan Elements of Modern Easter Celebrations:


As you might be able to tell, the name ?Easter? was likely derived from Eostre, the name of the Anglo-Saxon lunar goddess, as was as the name for the female hormone estrogen. Eostre?s feast day was held on the first full moon following the vernal equinox ? a similar calculation as is used for Easter among Western Christians. On this date the goddess Eostre is believed by her followers to mate with the solar god, conceiving a child who would be born 9 months later on Yule, the winter solstice which falls on December 21st.

Two of Eostre?s most important symbols were the hare (both because of its fertility and because ancient people saw a hare in the full moon) and the egg, which symbolized the growing possibility of new life. Each of these symbols continues to play an important role in modern celebrations of Easter. Curiously, they are also symbols which Christianity has not fully incorporated into its own mythology. Other symbols from other holidays have been given new Christian meanings, but attempts to do the same here have failed.

American Christians continue to generally celebrate Easter as a religious holiday, but public references to Easter almost never include any religious elements. Christians and non-Christians alike celebrate Easter in decidedly non-Christian ways: with chocolate and other forms of Easter candy, Easter eggs, Easter egg hunts, the Easter bunny, and so forth. Most cultural references to Easter include these elements, most of which are pagan in origin and all of which have become commercialized.


http://atheism.about.com/od/easterholidayseason/p/PaganChristian.htm

4/3/2016 7:59:44 PM Easter Pagan origins  

ludlowlowell
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Asanb, good post, but I would like to correct one thing: in popular culture, Easter eggs and Easter bunnies are emphasized over the resurrection of Jesus, true, but in churches, and in the liturgies of churches, Jesus' resurrection IS emphasized, and in a big way.



[Edited 4/3/2016 8:00:22 PM ]

4/3/2016 8:58:30 PM Easter Pagan origins  

rufftreasure
Over 10,000 Posts!!! (15,483)
Fairmont, MN
60, joined Jun. 2014


You don't pay attention at all ,DO you?

You go about your happy way, and couldn't care less about what asanb just posted.

Oblivious to their origins, or their meanings, and symbolism.