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1/21/2015 2:00:34 PM Good breed for a little boy  
hatesthesun
Biddeford, ME
32, joined Sep. 2014


What's a good breed of small dog "under 40 lbs" that would be good for a ADHD boy and has sensory issues that's almost 7? im thinking at least female, he wants a pug, but I don't know what to think of that




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1/21/2015 2:41:41 PM Good breed for a little boy  

fran567
Seabrook, NH
66, joined Oct. 2007


Try a minature beagle. They are wonderful pets and get along very well with everthing.

1/21/2015 8:23:43 PM Good breed for a little boy  
msreesi
Over 2,000 Posts (2,785)
Stout, OH
53, joined Jul. 2014


I like Australian Shepherds. They are gentle and very intuitive, and there are Miniature Aussies. The one in my profile pic is a standard and I just recently got a miniature through a rescue. The miniature is about 17-18 inches tall at the shoulder and weighs 19-20 lbs, and is full grown.

You will get all different opinions on what dog would be best, but what you might consider trying is taking your son to a Humane Society or contact a rescue and take your son and see which dog he connects with in the size range you require.

The pluses are that you'll be saving a life, the dogs have all of their vet work done- so you won't have to worry with anything like that, and the dogs know that you have rescued them. Also, there are as many purebreds in rescue as there are mixed breeds. Just a thought.

1/22/2015 2:25:27 PM Good breed for a little boy  
hatesthesun
Biddeford, ME
32, joined Sep. 2014


Yes I'm gonna check out the shelter. My cat is a shelter cat and he's great

1/23/2015 6:57:05 PM Good breed for a little boy  
cupocheer
Over 10,000 Posts!!! (252,261)
Assumption, IL
68, joined May. 2010


Little "boys" shouldn't breed.

1/23/2015 9:35:55 PM Good breed for a little boy  
msreesi
Over 2,000 Posts (2,785)
Stout, OH
53, joined Jul. 2014


Quote from hatesthesun:
Yes I'm gonna check out the shelter. My cat is a shelter cat and he's great




1/23/2015 9:49:02 PM Good breed for a little boy  
just_zoe1958
Over 10,000 Posts!!! (20,787)
Burlington, VT
58, joined Dec. 2011


I have seen some really lovable pugs that just love children and I have seen a pug so mean that it attacked my sister's Chihuahua when she was just walking by.
It probably the same for many breeds. Meet the puppy's parents, if you can, watch the way the dog interacts with your son.
My nephew has ADHD. He loves the family dog and I think she gave him a lot of comfort when he was growing up. Sometimes others didn't understand why he either had his nose in a book or was so active if he wasn't intellectually challenged. The dog helped him get in touch with emotions and understanding how others feel.

1/24/2015 11:12:29 AM Good breed for a little boy  
hatesthesun
Biddeford, ME
32, joined Sep. 2014


(this post has been flagged as inappropriate, sorry.)

2/1/2015 7:04:59 PM Good breed for a little boy  
fiftysome
Over 2,000 Posts (2,736)
Concord, MI
55, joined May. 2014


Hands Down----->>> Boston Terriers are #1

2/1/2015 9:07:06 PM Good breed for a little boy  
msreesi
Over 2,000 Posts (2,785)
Stout, OH
53, joined Jul. 2014


Quote from fiftysome:
Hands Down----->>> Boston Terriers are #1


I have to disagree. Bostons are a nervous breed of dog, therefore not the best choice for a child.

2/1/2015 9:18:38 PM Good breed for a little boy  
msreesi
Over 2,000 Posts (2,785)
Stout, OH
53, joined Jul. 2014


Quote from msreesi:
I have to disagree. Bostons are a nervous breed of dog, therefore not the best choice for a child.


I did some searching after posting this, and what I read is that they are good with kids. My apologies on my mistake. I've only seen a few, so guess I'll research them more (but then, I lean more towards medium and large breed dogs).

2/3/2015 8:46:51 PM Good breed for a little boy  
fiftysome
Over 2,000 Posts (2,736)
Concord, MI
55, joined May. 2014


apology accepted I've raised them since 1980.

2/6/2015 4:09:02 PM Good breed for a little boy  
msreesi
Over 2,000 Posts (2,785)
Stout, OH
53, joined Jul. 2014


Quote from fiftysome:
I've raised them since 1980.


Sorry, but as a rescuer adopter who has seen too many purebreds in Humane Societies and Shelters- that makes me sad.



[Edited 2/6/2015 4:12:18 PM ]

2/7/2015 8:59:29 AM Good breed for a little boy  
fiftysome
Over 2,000 Posts (2,736)
Concord, MI
55, joined May. 2014


relax

2/19/2015 2:59:00 AM Good breed for a little boy  

yuhaszb
Indiana, PA
45, joined May. 2014


a c*cker spaniel is a good choice.

2/19/2015 9:32:04 AM Good breed for a little boy  
cupocheer
Over 10,000 Posts!!! (252,261)
Assumption, IL
68, joined May. 2010


Also a spaniel ... A Springer Spaniel

2/25/2015 9:13:55 PM Good breed for a little boy  
chevydelight
Killen, AL
39, joined Mar. 2014


how bout a rat terrier most are energetic which in ure case may be a plus

3/19/2015 10:03:00 AM Good breed for a little boy  

jjjunit
Moreno Valley, CA
38, joined Aug. 2010


Quote from fiftysome:
Hands Down----->>> Boston Terriers are #1
I agree a terrier is a good bread for a little kid.

3/29/2015 12:33:29 AM Good breed for a little boy  

mary_e0612
Over 10,000 Posts!!! (23,521)
Kalamazoo, MI
59, joined Nov. 2014


Boxers. High energy loves kids. Wears the child out first.

3/30/2015 6:52:09 AM Good breed for a little boy  
cupocheer
Over 10,000 Posts!!! (252,261)
Assumption, IL
68, joined May. 2010


Little boys shouldn't breed.

4/12/2015 9:12:18 PM Good breed for a little boy  

electronicwolf
Jeffersonville, IN
54, joined Sep. 2011


I agree that a little beagle makes good pets for some of the other breeds of people are wrecking mending they have health problems,Real tiny dog you take the risk of injuries , different breeds of larger dogs usually have a shorter life as well as you need to think about food and care for is been more maintenance free

4/22/2015 4:08:30 PM Good breed for a little boy  

frograbbittoad
Over 1,000 Posts (1,614)
Mount Pleasant, MI
62, joined May. 2008


Any breed is fine.The main concern is if
this animal is trained for this purpose.

http://www.specialneeds.com/children-and-parents/general-special-needs/4-paws-ability-gives-service-dogs-kids

The cost to train a dog is $22,000.00

4/23/2015 12:27:34 PM Good breed for a little boy  
msreesi
Over 2,000 Posts (2,785)
Stout, OH
53, joined Jul. 2014


The best sites to learn what is 'truly' approved and what is not as far as a Service Dogs- is to go straight to the source. Here are some links that spell out the guidelines and the commonly asked questions about Service dogs.

http://www.ada.gov/service_animals_2010.htm

http://www.ada.gov/qasrvc.htm

I always share these links to educate people, as there are so many running around claiming their dogs are "Service animals" and carrying "fake certification" that they've bought online from a site that has never seen the dog, and knows nothing about the dog or it's training.

OP- if you want a dog as a pet for your son, I'd still check shelters. Lots of wonderful dogs are being euthanized daily because there aren't enough homes.

If you are wanting one as a "Service Dog" please speak to a "qualified" training facility. You can look for training facilities online (use caution, as there are a lot of "scam sites")- and even if they don't let dogs go to kids under a certain age, they should be willing to answer your questions and be able to refer you to a facility that does accommodate children, and make yourself informed.

If you find a site one of the best clues to whether they are legit- is if they call a Service Dog a "Therapy Dog" - Service dogs and Therapy Dogs are two entirely different things. Different purposes, and different public access.

Here's the difference:

Therapy (and facility)Dog- is basically a obedience trained gentle dog of any breed that is only permitted in hospitals, nursing homes, Hospices, etc- to comfort patients there. Facility dog is a Therapy dog that lives in the facility. There was a facility Therapy dog where my Mom was a patient. It was comfort to the patients and their families.

Service Dog- A dog specially trained to it's owner's/client's specific needs. Full public access- only restricted from areas such as operating rooms or burn units where an animal may compromise a sterile environment.

Here are some children friendly Service dog training facilities:

4pawsforability.org

www.pawsibilitiesunleashed.org/Service-Dogs - this site is great- great information.

4/23/2015 2:25:34 PM Good breed for a little boy  

wineandroses2
Over 10,000 Posts!!! (13,559)
Middleport, OH
60, joined Oct. 2013


C*cker Spaniels can be high strung and mean. I had one and Acker was mean with people.

5/7/2015 9:34:44 PM Good breed for a little boy  

yuhaszb
Indiana, PA
45, joined May. 2014


a pug could be a good choice. most of the pugs that I have been in contact with are very friendly. some are protective. some hyper but I have never known any that have been aggressive.

I also thought of another breed you may want to consider - Yorkie



[Edited 5/7/2015 9:36:04 PM ]

5/7/2015 10:42:08 PM Good breed for a little boy  
msreesi
Over 2,000 Posts (2,785)
Stout, OH
53, joined Jul. 2014


No offense, but I would not recommend a Yorkie for a child. They can be "nippy".

5/8/2015 10:20:51 PM Good breed for a little boy  
just_zoe1958
Over 10,000 Posts!!! (20,787)
Burlington, VT
58, joined Dec. 2011


My mom's neighbor adopted a Yorkie for her young children and he has never has bitten or snapped at him. Don't label a breed. I still believe a lot has to do with how they were raised and their emotional stability.

I worry about shelter dogs because you don't know their background. Sometimes the agency lies just to get them adopted or honestly don't know a lot about them. I was just reading about dogs that attack and kill, unprovoked. More often than not, they had an abusive past and came from a shelter. Remember these dogs often come from a puppy mills.
I think I would rather get one from someone who home raised them. JMHO

5/11/2015 6:42:23 PM Good breed for a little boy  
msreesi
Over 2,000 Posts (2,785)
Stout, OH
53, joined Jul. 2014


Zoe, I did not and do not "label" breeds. I don't agree with BSL.
I adore all breeds, and would rescue and help any breed. I have a Yorkie, and love that little girl to pieces! She is 15 years old now, and is failing in health, which is breaking my heart knowing that the inevitable is closer than ever.

As far as my post, all I did was make a "heads up" comment based on knowledge of both the Yorkie breed, as well as how busy parents are.
Contrary to popular opinion, Yorkies are not the quiet little lap dogs that people like to think they are. They were in fact, originally bred and used as rat killers.
That means they have a medium energy level, and mine has always had (and at 15 years old and in failing health still has) "energy bursts".
They, like all other breeds, need ample exercise and play time to curb their high energy level, and keep them happy, well adjusted and mentally stable. Not allowing for that exercise time every single day, can result in dogs that are yappy, nippy (not really biting, but pinching the skin with their teeth) and destructive. That's true of any breed.
These are things a prospective owner needs to keep in mind, regardless of what breed they choose to add to their family.

As far as your comments about shelter pets, unprovoked attacks, and "home raised litters";

Unprovoked attacks ALWAYS have a cause, and it is not the dogs past history, because dogs do not "think back". They live "in the moment". So, whatever is happening in their life now, is the basis for their actions/reactions now. The fault behind the alleged "unprovoked" attacks lie squarely on the current owner. Either it's from the owners negligence, by not properly training their dog, or it's from not exercising their dog enough to "work off" their excess energy (dogs want to work. Most breeds were developed to do jobs, and like us, they are happiest when they feel that they are being useful). If the owner happens to have more dogs than one, the owner also needs to assert himself as the "Alpha" and maintain control of the "pack".
But news media and magazines, as well as the current owner will use the "previously abused" angle, the news media because fear sells copy (for instance, check the market on antibacterial cleaning products. They sell those by playing on people's fear of germs). Meanwhile, the negligent owner uses it to keep out of trouble by passing his blame off on the dog. The dog is the one who pays the price. Usually by being "destroyed".

Now as for the "home raised" pups; having dealt with many health issues from back yard breeders and their "home raised" pups, and having also adopted previously abused dogs, believe it or not, I've had better luck with the latter.

5/13/2015 6:12:44 PM Good breed for a little boy  
just_zoe1958
Over 10,000 Posts!!! (20,787)
Burlington, VT
58, joined Dec. 2011


I was going by the police and investigators reports.

DOMINANCE AGGRESSION: He bites because he is dominant (superior in his own mind) to the offender, or to establish or maintain his dominance.
MALE HORMONAL DOMINANCE AGGRESSION: Have your male dog neutered to greatly reduce the risk that he will attack
PACK HUNTING and PREDATORY INSTINCTS: When dogs gather as a pack, in any number, primitive pack hunting instincts are activated. One relatively benign dog can be pulled into the excitement of the death frenzy if he is in enough of the wrong company. If he’s a medium to large size dog he could contribute substantially to the injury or death.
UNNATURAL SELECTION FOR AGGRESSIVE TRAITS: Temperament is preprogrammed to some extent by the amount of aggression in his genetic material.

Behavior is part genetic (what they were born with) and part environmental (anything that happens after birth).
Behavior is part genetic (what they were born with) and part environmental (anything that happens after birth).
•The genetic component of behavior can be influenced through the intent of the breeding program over a large enough period of time, usually hundreds of years. Thus, it is incorrect to say that any breed of dog is equally suitable as a pet for a family with young children. Your small animal veterinarian is a valuable resource in this matter.
•Genetics influenced by many generations of human interference and unnatural selection, can pull a dog forcefully in the direction of the genetic traits that humans have selected.
•Some breeding programs have repeatedly chosen the most aggressive dogs with powerful bites, a tendency to bite and not let go, and powerful musculature and have repeatedly bred the most vicious offspring with deliberate intent to create a “super-killer”
•If the genes were repeatedly tamed by choosing breeding parents with the most loving and gentle natures over hundreds of years, you have a pull away from the more primitive and dangerous instincts.


ABSENT, POOR OR NEGATIVE SOCIALIZATION: Early proper socialization cannot be overemphasized Early windows, or time frames, for imprinting positive feelings towards humans can be missed in the puppy mill.

5/13/2015 6:14:42 PM Good breed for a little boy  
just_zoe1958
Over 10,000 Posts!!! (20,787)
Burlington, VT
58, joined Dec. 2011


I still prefer to adopt a puppy from a reputable breeder than one from a shelter unless I know the background.



[Edited 5/13/2015 6:16:44 PM ]

5/13/2015 10:15:13 PM Good breed for a little boy  
msreesi
Over 2,000 Posts (2,785)
Stout, OH
53, joined Jul. 2014


Why'd you block me, Zoe? I read your posts, and thought they were very informative, although I do still firmly believe that police reports are often biased. An abusive or neglectful owner will blame the dog if it covers their own butt.

But you know, we can agree to disagree and still see each other points of view, and have a good conversation, which is what the forums are all about.

But you made the choice to block, so farewell and God bless.



[Edited 5/13/2015 10:16:12 PM ]

5/14/2015 10:47:32 AM Good breed for a little boy  
msreesi
Over 2,000 Posts (2,785)
Stout, OH
53, joined Jul. 2014


Here's a post I saw on Facebook yesterday. Please read it and look at the pictures. It's about a double merle Great Dane. While reading it, please know that I rescued such a dog from a breeder (mine was a double merle Australian Shepherd). My dog was given the best life I could give him, and was happy all of his days, but died at a very young 6 years old. There were 3 other litter mates like him (Double merle (MM) white, one born blind, one born without eyes (just think of it this way, if the genetic can cause a pup to be born without eyes, what other organs can be affected?), and two deaf (even the eye pupils of the deaf pups were misshapen (starburst), so they couldn't constrict properly, making them high risk for blindness). The two blind pups were euthanized, the two deaf ones were sold. It was all for $$$. We got the last deaf one (to rescue and protect him) and had I been there before the other one was sold, I would have gotten them both because I knew what a MM bred "white" pup meant. They sold them at a lower price, because the breed registry will not register MM white pups.
This is why I take this topic, as well as rescue and adopt, so seriously. Sick and birth defected puppies are born every day and destroyed every day because of people and their greed. It doesn't need to be that way. The animals didn't ask to be born.

http://diply.com/auntyacid/man-films-sick-dog/125462?fb_comment_id=835723349810747_835838026465946&comment_id=835838026465946&offset=0&total_comments=16#/f77664effbc27


Someone please quote this post so Zoe will see it. Thanks

5/14/2015 12:46:19 PM Good breed for a little boy  
just_zoe1958
Over 10,000 Posts!!! (20,787)
Burlington, VT
58, joined Dec. 2011


No, it didn't really have to do with differing opinions as it is your attitude that bothers me. I do not claim or act like I have or know all the answers, I do not. Some questions asked here should be addressed by professionals ONLY. Helpful hints are great but do not assume that ones advice is better than the veterinarians. If so, then I advise finding another veterinarian.

To find a good breed dog, go to a dog show or a dog show/ obedience training combination. We have those here. They are run by professionals that truly know about breeds of dogs and training. Go to someone who has a degree there or has spent and devoted their whole life to it.



My current veterinarian is a graduate of the National Veterinary School in Lyon, France and has an advanced degree in microbiology. His special interest is in small animal and exotic animal surgery. He is a graduate of the ECFVG program and did his U.S. Clinical training at Iowa Sate University. He has been in practice with his wife in Vermont since 1997. His wife is a graduate of Yale University and the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine. Her special interest is in internal medicine cases for all species including small mammals and reptiles.

My cat allowed them to draw blood, carry her without any struggling. She laid on the bench waiting to see him. The Vet called me with the results. I trust the advise he gives me and I do read up on it so that I can follow along with his advice.
jmho

5/17/2015 9:58:42 AM Good breed for a little boy  
msreesi
Over 2,000 Posts (2,785)
Stout, OH
53, joined Jul. 2014


OP- I truly believe you will do a great job in choosing the best dog for your son. Follow your intuition.

My apologies for my part in the "snafu" that occurred here in your thread.

5/18/2015 8:09:17 PM Good breed for a little boy  

ontheloose69
Over 2,000 Posts (2,334)
Dyer, IN
54, joined Oct. 2009


small black labs the best get a female. hell no to beagles damn bark is annoying

6/7/2015 4:11:40 PM Good breed for a little boy  
sankie1
Over 10,000 Posts!!! (10,691)
Irvine, KY
69, joined Dec. 2011


Quote from msreesi:
I have to disagree. Bostons are a nervous breed of dog, therefore not the best choice for a child.


I also disagree with having a Boston Terrier for a child. They are very high strung, tempermental, and require lots of attention. My daughter in law had one and it was a pain to have around, especially as it aged. Was jealous of her and would pee on everything in the house if left alone. Jump, buck, bark, and even bite if it took a dislike to someone. Need lots of room for them to play and be energenic enough to keep up with them.

6/11/2015 6:32:38 PM Good breed for a little boy  

pdforone
Over 10,000 Posts!!! (27,219)
Litchfield, OH
65, joined Jul. 2010


Quote from sankie1:
I also disagree with having a Boston Terrier for a child. They are very high strung, tempermental, and require lots of attention. My daughter in law had one and it was a pain to have around, especially as it aged. Was jealous of her and would pee on everything in the house if left alone. Jump, buck, bark, and even bite if it took a dislike to someone. Need lots of room for them to play and be energenic enough to keep up with them.


I would have to disagree with that statement, I have a Boston and had 3 others in the past when I was married and my kids were young.

Many seem to blame the breed for their own improper training or lack of an effort to train them. The 3 my wife owned and took responsibility were a handful, she made little or no effort to train them and seemed to resent when I attempted to.

I got mine after I retired and had time to spend training him, all it took was a bit of time, correction and reward. I live on 4+ acres in the country, he doesn't leave the yard except on rare occasions to visit my neighbor's grandkids. He still likes to play! them running and laughing means he is going to visit.

He used to rough house with my son (26) and I, he seems to get that since I am disabled and can no longer do it my son only is fair game. He never rough housed with my daughters, or any little kids, that was a no no. My daughter brought my youngest grand daughter here a couple of weeks after she was born, set her in the bassinet down on the living room floor and he came over to her, gave her a sniff, licked her face once, and laid on the floor next to the bassinet in protection mode, they are buddies now.

He has his toys, those are the only thing he is allowed to play with, no chewing or tearing things up. My son or I can leave a plate of food on the couch or end table and he won't go near it. If food falls on the floor? it's fair game!

Just training, you need patience and can't give mixed signals.

Boston's don't handle extremely hot weather well, you can't chain them outside in the heat and leave them. If mine is outside on a hot day? his butt is parked under one of my shade trees. They have strong jaws, but not much in the way of teeth. He is protective of his territory, it's his home too, strange animals or people will get a reaction. Alpha dog, king of his castle.